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Whilst Asian hornets numbers in the UK have fortunately been very low to date, the teams tracking and capturing Asian hornets have found they are particularly attracted to flowering ivy in the late summer/autumn

The following are flower/tree species that Beekeepers in Jersey have noticed the Asian hornets seem to particularly like.

Trees – Look out for trees exuding sap or that have been damaged by Goat Moth grubs that cause trees to bleed, especially oaks.

The saps seems highly attractive to butterflies, wasps, European hornets and Asian Hornets. The Jersey hornet hunters call them Magic Trees!

Lycium chinense – Common name Duke of Argyll’s Tea Plant. Found along coastal zones. Country of origin China. Autumn flowering. The fruits are commonly known as Goji berries.

Camellia sasanqua – (Anemone flower form) often found in well-established gardens. Country of origin China. Autumn flowering

Phormium tenax – New Zealand Flax. Country of origin New Zealand, Summer flowering.

Sechium edule – Common name Chayote, a member of the squash family, growing as a vine. Country of origin South America. Grown and used widely in oriental medicine. Autumn flowering.

Fatsia Japonica – Glossy-leaf paper plant, fatsi, paperplant, false castor oil plant, or Japanese aralia. Origin southern Japan, southern Korea, and Taiwan. Autumn flowering.

x Fatshedera – inter-genetic hybrid between Fatsia and Hedera helix (Common ivy)

Hedera helix – Common Ivy. Asian hornets enjoy the flowers but also can be seen predating on the numerous other insects that enjoy flowering Ivy in the Autumn.

Musa/Musella – banana plants, various in the Musa species. Native to China.

Fruit Trees – plum, apple, pear, fig, grape-vine. Hornets enjoy the ripe fruit.

WHAT TO DO IF YOU SEE SOMETHING SUSPICIOUS?

STOP! Assess the situation. Stay 10 metres away and don’t touch, disturb or cause vibrations around a nest. Take a photograph if it is safe to do so. Report any possible hornet or nest sightings by using the Asian Hornet Watch App, emailing ahat@swhbk.org.uk or calling our Asian Hornet hotline on 07849 102621.

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